Pleasant Surprises

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

After the rainy days, one inflorescence grew from a caladium that's in a planter box together with a Mexican sunflower...



These 'dancing ladies' brought some joy back to this nook of my garden. The earlier spike of flowers that grew out was broken due to the heavy raindrops. Then later the sun dried up the spike :-(


But now I am seeing two other new flower spikes growing out from this little orchid!




The bloom of this dianthus lasted for a number of days. This little plant started from a stem cutting ;-)




It is always wonderful to see plants re-blooming. This red gerbera daisy is one of them. Although the size shrunk, the flower looks as cheery as before and lasting.




Cactus Zinnia meanwhile is still blooming but this flower has less petals than the earlier one.



My Little Bird plant has grown to about three feet high now. The bracts have never stopped producing 'birds'!




My red and white Gloxinia has been flowering for 4 months already...



These are the recent surprises from my existing plants. I hope yours are flourishing well also. Have fun gardening!

You Might Also Like

15 comments

  1. There's nothing like pleasant surprices, and such a lovely one too, pure white colour that is. Rain isn't all that funny ( it's raining heavily here today as well..) but all the plants normally are greatful, look at all those nice flowers to cheer you up. Your orchid's really pretty.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Steph. Oh, I so love your gorgeous Gloxinia. What great petals on the cactus zinnia. Pretty blooms!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nothing like a very cheerful garden with lots of blooms to brighten your day Stephs! I love all your pretty blooms.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Your garden must be very beautiful with so many pretty flowers around! The caladium flower looks exotic!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Beautiful flowers! Are anthuriums, callas, arums, alocasia, dieffenbachia, agloanema somehow related? The flowers all look the same. Love that colour on your dianthus. Gerbera still die on me. My house has like 40 bird plants now (father's new obsession) and my gloxinia has no more flowers now.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Aaron, they are aroids. This family of plants is one of my favourites. The other is the gesneraid family of plants. Btw, can ask your father why my little bird plant, the bracts blush are so pale (not so red)?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Gloxinia blooming for 4 months? Wow, congrats, Steph. Mine has been chewing up by the squirrels so it could never re-bloom!

    ReplyDelete
  8. My daisy occupied 3 different spots in my garden this year. First spot, it got scorched, 2nd the leaves shrunk and dried, 3rd, it flowered again but the flower deformed with missing petals tho leaves looking slightly healthier. Congrats on having yours amazingly pretty, Steph. Mine is still in need of a lot of pampering.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful Gloxinia. I used to have one that exact color.
    Suzanne

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thats a nice caladium shot! The ones in our neighborhood did the same and I always wonder why they don't breed them for flowers too. I guess they are somewhat short lived, but what if?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Gorgeous pictures today, Steph.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Your gloxinias are beautiful! Lovely set of pictures, Steph. The dancing ladies are so cute!!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hard to believe they're real. Some of them look like they're made of silk or plastic. They so perfect. - But of course there's nothing more perfect than nature itself :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. It's always a pleasure to read what you have written for me. Thanks! I hope your plants will flourish lots of gorgeous blooms for you. Have another great week!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Im so jealous with your Gloxonias Stephanie.
    You really got your green hands on them.
    Though you have shared your information on how to take care of them, I'm still feeling skeptical as they may not survive in my shaded garden area.

    ReplyDelete

Paperblog

All Gardening Sites

BLOG SEARCH ENGINE

DIRECTORY OF GARDENING BLOGS

Contact Form

Name

Email *

Message *