Some Old, Some New

Monday, May 20, 2013

As a wedding that I attended last week is still fresh in my mind, when I saw my blue Plumbago in bloom, I recall a rhyme that goes like this...

Something old, something new,
Something borrowed, something blue,
And a silver sixpence in her shoe.

According to traditional British custom, the four "somethings" mentioned are meant for the bride to carry on her big day for good luck :-)

























The Spathoglottis kimballiana (Ground Orchid) shrub that was blossoming last week continued to see a few more flowers opening up. Love how the flowers look through the camera lens -- really striking against the green background. So I am posting this again today.


























Here is a little surprise from my Pedilanthus bracteatus (Little Bird Plant)... I spotted a new shoot growing out from the shrub! OMG I thought the rain would be killing another one of this shrub but instead a new one has sprouted. How wonderful! 

























A plant that has become rather popular is a shrub called Sabah Snake Grass. The botanical name is Clinacanthus nutans. These stem cuttings came from my aunt's house which my mum has helped to pin into this little pot. This herb that has been used to cure snake bites, which some believe can also be used to treat cancer -- chew and eat the leaves or blend them together with green apple and drink the juice, they say.


















My Goldfish Plant is getting 'stronger and stronger' by the days! I am so happy to see the plant in such condition even without blooms. Before this, the pot was left with very few leaves. It took the plant a long, long time to grow back to this state ;-)



















I spotted lots of holes on my lemon shrub. Later I found its little multi-legged friend...

























I just let it eat as much as it could and hope that it will come back to help pollinate the flowers that are in my garden later ;-)

Happy gardening, blogging... and have a great day!

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11 comments

  1. Hi .. like the plumbago's colour and the ground orchid... I've seen sabah snake grass grow almost 1 meter tall.. bigger container maybe..

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  2. Your garden is starting to really take off!

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  3. I just sent for plumbago seeds this morning that I forgot to get in late winter. LOL! I just love their pale blue blooms. So pretty Steph.

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  4. At one time about 2 years ago, an article on the sabah snake grass went viral when it was touted as an effective cure for cancer. Recently my mother started to plant some herbs which look similar. Would appreciatae if you could post a bigger image of the plant for identification purposes.

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  5. I never heard or seen Sabah snake grass before! Such a useful plant!

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  6. Thank you for visiting my blog Steph.
    I do like the very pale blue colour of your plumbago - yes your wedding rhyme - very common tradition for the bride to carry all these things.
    I do like the look of your little goldfish plant, I've never heard of that before.

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  7. Some flowers can be shown as often as possible, looks amazing. Your plants seems fresh and well tended as always, enjoy your garden :)

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  8. Hello Stephanie:=)

    I love the Plumbago plant. I have one white and two blue on my balcony. They are about three metros tall, and give me so much pleasure. I have never heard of the snake grass before, but will now look it up on Google. You have a lovely blog:)

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  9. You have really some unusual plant. Well, you live in Tropic :-P. I am trying to decide if I love the blue flowers or those pink flowers. They look so beautiful.

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  10. You mentioned that your Ground Orchid had just died?
    How sad...

    I have the same species in my garden for many years and they are doing so well. Yearly they give their blooms.
    If you do intend to buy them again - I suggest that you repot them with new set of soil as they ones they come with from the nursery are cocopeat and they do more harm than good in our lowland climate.

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