Garden of the Future

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

I laughed when I was reading this book, The Horticulture Gardener's Guides: Plants For Small Spaces by Clive Lane.



Below is what's written in its first chapter: History of the Small Garden


"As space becomes increasingly precious, our gardens grow ever smaller, but that need not limit what we do with them. Today's designers, as well as those of the past, have widely differing approaches to these tiny spaces, and we can easily borrow and adapt ideas from them. With the ever-increasing shortage of land and its high cost, and the heavy demands that are made on our time nowadays, the small garden has to be the garden of the future."

My humble garden... :-D

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22 comments

  1. And I laughed at your post too...that space is actually already a big space for the future garden! I can even make it look more big, you can have vertical shelves there and create hanging or vertical gardens. Underneath them can contain the shade loving ones, and at the back the taller ones. You can even have a trellis. If only i have that big space in the city, i will be very happy. I will have both vegies and ornamentals!

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  2. Your garden is very neat and tidy, beautifully arranged. I'm not worried about space though. We can have indoor gardens, table top gardens, miniature gardens, rooftop gardens. Human beings are very creative.

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  3. Bescheidener Garten .... Muss ich da DOCH lachen, so Sieht schön aus mit den Vielen topfen!
    Danke für Deinen Kommentar, ja, SIE Sieht aus Wie Biscuit, lach, ABER Wirklich wunderbar zum Haar. Vielleicht steck ich Dich ja NOCH ein, um Seifen zu sieden SELBST!
    Heute ist es sehr kalt mit Wieder Viel Regen, Wo bleibt Unser Sommer?

    liebe Grüße Dörte

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  4. I love your garden, Stephanie!

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  5. Thanks for sharing the history of your small garden. It was nice going through your blog. Keep on posting.

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  6. Some months ago, I had read an interesting post on your blog on edible flowers including dianthus. I expected your pots of dianthus would be cropped neat:)) But I am thrilled to see that the dianthus is thriving and how! Your container garden is lovely.

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  7. I love your garden, Steph. It's simply perfect. One can tell that you are so dedicated to your plants (they are lucky plants indeed)

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  8. I love it! Thats a very large space compared to my balcony! I actually would like to pick up a copy of the book though.

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  9. Stephanie,
    I'm having a pc issue.
    I don't know if my comment registered or not.
    I mentioned Malaysian butterflies, such as Blue Pansy, Horsfield's Baron,Painted Jezebel and your national butterfly, The Rajah Brooke's Birdwing. I wondered if these are visitors to your garden?
    Brad

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  10. Your garden is clean, neat and tidy.
    Something that I wish I can adapt myself into.

    There is such a big empty space - is it for parking your car?

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  11. Perhaps not the biggest park but a most beloved garden of mine :)It's not the size that's important but what we do with it :)

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  12. Hi James, yes, that empty space is a car parking space.

    Hi Brad, there are butterflies like Horsfield's Baron visiting my garden every now and then but I have not seen a Rajah Brooke before. Wow you really know these butterflies very well. Amazing!

    Hi Shailaja, thanks for leaving your comments! dianthus produces lots of flowers. But I've never use them. I would not be able to get use to eating flowers ;-) Place the plant in a sunny spot, well watered daily and good drainage for dianthus to flourish well.

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  13. Ooh, I love this long shot of your garden! We definitely don't post enough of these. I love it. The car is lucky to live among these beauties!

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  14. Hi Steph ... well your patio garden is about the same size as my courtyard garden and I just love that! Doesn't matter what the size of the garden is, as long as there are gardens!

    Thanks for visiting my post on the Bush Sunrises ... right now it's the last month of Autumn.

    June is the beginning of our Winter but I don't have to take any plants indoors as the temps don't usually drop much below 13 deg C ... that's around 55 deg F ... and that's only at nightime. Our winter daytime temperatures rarely drop below 20 deg C (68 deg F).

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  15. Hi Stephanie, your courtyard garden is tops. I think it does not really matter how big the garden, one can adapt and make of the smallest space a paradise. When I am in a city I always look up to the windows and balconies of tall houses. It is amazing what one can see, windowsills in flower, balconies chock-a- block full with plants.

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  16. I find your garden inspiring. Your healthy plants show that you care enough to understand their needs. I always enjoy posts about what's happening in your garden.

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  17. Your garden is lovely Stephanie, and how lucky you are being able to garden year-'round in your wonderful climate.

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  18. You have got a beautiful garden !!Very beautiful and lovely !!

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  19. Dear Steph, I love the neatness of your garden. Your plants are so beautifully organized. Love to see more sharing from your garden.

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  20. Wahahaha! I think this book is for me - with little space (in fact need to rent space an hour away from home to plant my tree :P). Your garden is lovely Steph. Neat and Beautiful :)

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  21. Hi Steph, your garden is beautiful and very neat! It looks spacious as well!

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  22. Thanks all for your leaving your kind comments :-D

    Sandy & copy Rainforest Gardener, the book will have lots of plants that are suitable for your climate (temperate)!

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